Of Pork and Politics: Washington in the Pig War

By Washington, Our Home|June 8, 2017|History, Military, State Parks, Western Washington|0 comments

We’re all familiar with the historic events that led to the American Revolution, when the American Colonies seceded from rule by Great Britain. Somewhat less well known are the reasons behind the second war between England and the U.S…the War of 1812. But it’s unlikely you can find very many people who can tell you about the third war between these two superpowers, which took place – or, more accurately,

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Easy week in eastern Washington, Part 1: The roads less traveled

By Washington, Our Home|June 26, 2012|Central Washington, Eastern Washington, Family, Fishing, Recreation, State Parks|0 comments

My father, Walt Ebel, and I began our second annual trip to the Colville Indian Reservation on a Monday in early June. Dad’s been doing this for decades; he visits his best friend, Lyn, and they spend a week on Twin Lakes at Hartman’s Log Cabin Resort near Inchelium. Last year I decided to finally accept their invitation and had such a good time I wanted to make it an

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What’s in a name? As it turns out, a lot

By Washington, Our Home|April 10, 2012|Central Washington, History, Legislature, Puget Sound, Western Washington|3 comments

As I tweeted last week, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources’ Committee on Geographic Names is meeting to consider changing the names of a number of Washington State locations, the most prominent being Soap Lake in Grant County. Someone had the bright idea of renaming it “Lake Smokiam” despite the local community having spent th0usands of dollars marketing the lake’s alleged medicinal properties. Needless to say, Soap Lake residents

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Young man in a hurry: The life of Isaac Stevens

By Washington, Our Home|April 2, 2012|Central Washington, History, Legislature, Western Washington|5 comments

Isaac Ingalls Stevens was the first governor of the newly-formed Washington Territory in 1853. I’ve been reading more about the significance of his life since I began diving into library books about Washington state history. In a previous post I wrote about how I visited the cemetery where our first territorial lieutenant governor, Charles Mason, is buried. He served as the acting governor of Washington Territory while Isaac Stevens was

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Paving over history at old Fort Steilacoom

By Washington, Our Home|March 29, 2012|Puget Sound, Western Washington|0 comments

Earlier this week I became aware of a plan to pave over part of the parade grounds at old Fort Steilacoom in Lakewood. The property belongs to Western State Hospital – itself an icon of Washington State History – and the hospital is managed by the state Department of Social and Health Services. Through my work with 28th District State Senator Mike Carrell, R-Lakewood, who represents the district in which

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Western State Hospital and Fort Steilacoom Park

By Washington, Our Home|March 20, 2012|Western Washington|0 comments

Kelly was feeling under the weather one day last week, so I decided to take Parker off her hands and get him out of the house for a bit. I had wanted to make a day out of it, perhaps visiting the recreated Fort Nisqually on Point Defiance, visiting the old Fort Nisqually in DuPont (and the historic Dynamite Train), or Fort Steilacoom Park between the two. Being that the

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Some insight into the life of Thomas Frost

By Washington, Our Home|February 19, 2012|Ocean, Puget Sound, Western Washington|2 comments

Last week, I began planning the first full episode of the Washington, Our Home, video series and I decided the creation and exploration of the Willamette Meridian would be a good first start. To begin with, as I asked in a previous blog post, I had to learn why in the world someone in the mid-1800’s would decide that a straight line north and south from Portland, Oregon, was even necessary.

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