The Columbia Gorge has a north side, too

By Washington, Our Home|June 30, 2015|Central Washington, History, Legislature, Restaurants, State Parks|2 comments

Believe it or not, there are actually people who don’t know the Columbia River has another side. Some of those folks have admitted as much to Earlene Sullivan, Executive Director at the Greater Goldendale Area Chamber of Commerce, who unfortunately understands the sentiment. Interstate 84, the fastest way to get inland from the sprawling, urban metropolis of Portland, zips along the northern border of Oregon…the south side of the Columbia River. Many a Pacific Northwesterner are familiar with

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Pressing On: Two Family-Owned Newspapers in the 21st Century

By Washington, Our Home|February 3, 2015|Events, History, Legislature|0 comments

“Pressing On” is the story of two family-owned newspapers, The Seattle Times and The Wenatchee World. They’re steeped in Washington history and dedicated to public-service journalism. Presenters include Frank and Ryan Blethen (The Seattle Times) Rowland Thompson (Allied Daily Newspapers), and Rufus and Wilfred Woods (The Wenatchee World).

Time to finish what I start

By Washington, Our Home|January 1, 2015|General, History, Legislature, Seattle Mariners, Sports Teams, Western Washington|0 comments

Happy new year, and welcome to 2015! In the spirit of new beginnings, making resolutions and so forth, I thought I would share some of the blog posts from the last two years that didn’t quite make it to the publish stage. So let it be known that, from this day forward, I will finish every blog post I start – no matter the time or research involved, and no matter

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What’s in a name? As it turns out, a lot

By Washington, Our Home|April 10, 2012|Central Washington, History, Legislature, Puget Sound, Western Washington|3 comments

As I tweeted last week, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources’ Committee on Geographic Names is meeting to consider changing the names of a number of Washington State locations, the most prominent being Soap Lake in Grant County. Someone had the bright idea of renaming it “Lake Smokiam” despite the local community having spent th0usands of dollars marketing the lake’s alleged medicinal properties. Needless to say, Soap Lake residents

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Young man in a hurry: The life of Isaac Stevens

By Washington, Our Home|April 2, 2012|Central Washington, History, Legislature, Western Washington|5 comments

Isaac Ingalls Stevens was the first governor of the newly-formed Washington Territory in 1853. I’ve been reading more about the significance of his life since I began diving into library books about Washington state history. In a previous post I wrote about how I visited the cemetery where our first territorial lieutenant governor, Charles Mason, is buried. He served as the acting governor of Washington Territory while Isaac Stevens was

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